"From Ashes to the Living Font"

Composer Alan Hommerding, during our interview in December 2017 at World Library Publications in Chicago, Illinois.

Composer Alan Hommerding, during our interview in December 2017 at World Library Publications in Chicago, Illinois.

Brace yourself for a double whammy: our first Lenten episode and our first hymnody conversation! Join Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert as they chat with composer and text-writer Alan Hommerding. They discuss the way metrical hymns works, the "evaporating pool" of hymn tunes in American parishes, and the need for a moratorium on the tune BEACH SPRING (no, not really). Whether you know a lot about hymns, are new to hymns, or think you don't like hymns (you're wrong, by the way), you'll learn something new in this episode. 

So, please open your hymnal to "From Ashes to the Living Font."

 

Episode links

For more information about Alan Hommerding and his other compositions, visit his composer page at World Library Publications. You can read the blog post Alan mentions at PrayTell.

You can purchase a copy of the score from World Library Publications. By following these links, you can also purchase the other song recordings you heard in the episode: "Return to the Lord" (Paul Tate) and "O Sacred Head Surrounded" (Bach/Hassler).

You can purchase the organ instrumental recording of ST. FLAVIAN and the piano instrumental recording of LAND OF REST on iTunes. The piano instrumental recordings of BEECHER and BEACH SPRING were recorded by Fr. Robert Koopmann, OSB, on the album "Sacred Improvisations."

You can view the video of comedian Andy Andrews singing the text of "Amazing Grace" to different tunes on YouTube.

You can view video of the conversation with Dr. Lynn Trapp and Dr. Jennifer Pascuale, "The Hymns Every Parish Should Know," in the NPM digital media library. It can be accessed through NPM's website, www.npm.org. NOTE: You must be a member to access the video content. Sign up today!

You can visit the Hymnary website at www.hymnary.org.

You can learn more about the One Call Institute by visiting www.onecallinstitute.org.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"You Have Anointed Me"

From left to right: Gary daigle, terry donohoo, marty haugen, rory cooney, Fr. michael joncas, and david haas - all OYH podcast alumni!

From left to right: Gary daigle, terry donohoo, marty haugen, rory cooney, Fr. michael joncas, and david haas - all OYH podcast alumni!

In this episode, we host our own little composers forum! Matt and Zack speak with Gary Daigle - composer, musician, and producer - about his work with The Dameans. They discuss collaborative song writing, the importance of a broad harmonic vocabulary, and how intentional invitation can change your life. As a bonus, you'll hear from a bevy of previous podcast guests including Rory Cooney, Kate Cuddy, Fr. Fran O'Brien, Tony Alonso, and Marty Haugen. It's a liturgical composers family reunion, and you get a front row seat! 

So, please open your hymnal to "You Have Anointed Me."

 

Episode links

For more information about Gary Daigle and his other compositions, visit his composer page at GIA Publications.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from GIA Publications. Here you can also purchase the other song recordings you heard in the episode: "Peace is Flowing" (arr. and performed by Steve Petrunak), "Path of Life" and "Remember Your Love" (The Dameans), "Ubi Caritas" (Fr. Fran O'Brien), "On That Day" (Kate Cuddy), "This is My Song" (arr. and performed by Michael Mahler and Tony Alonso), and "Where Your Treasure Is" (Marty Haugen). The recording of "One Bread, One Body" (Fr. John Foley, SJ) can be purchased from OCP. 

The cover of "You Have Anointed Me" by Brenda Folz can be purchased on iTunes.

You can see photos and videos from the 20th annual Liturgical Composers Forum by visiting our Facebook page.

You can learn more about the One Call Institute by visiting www.onecallinstitute.org. The blog post that Matt mentions can be found here.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"Canticle of the Turning"

Group shot! Podcast guests Jaime Cortez, David Haas, Rory Cooney, and Gary Daigle.  

Group shot! Podcast guests Jaime Cortez, David Haas, Rory Cooney, and Gary Daigle.  

Rory Cooney is a not only a gifted composer, he is also a prophetic writer of texts. In this interview, Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert speak with Rory about the background of one of his best-loved pieces, "Canticle of the Turning," to learn more about his theological and catechetical treatment of the Magnificat text. They also discuss the use of secular Irish folk melody with special guest, Ian Callanan, who joins the conversation from Ireland. 

So, please open your hymnal to "Canticle of the Turning."

 

Episode links

For more information about Rory Cooney and his other compositions, visit his composer pages at GIA Publications, OCP, and WLP. Also, be sure to check out his blog, "Gentle Reign". The specific blog post about this song is from August, 2014.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from GIA Publications. Here you can also purchase the instrumental piano recording of "Canticle of the Turning" (by Paul Tate) as well as David Haas' setting of the Magnificat, "Holy is Your Name." You can purchase Fr. Michael Joncas' setting, "Mary's Song," and Carey Landry's song "Hail Mary: Gentle Woman" at OCP.

The recording of "Star of the County Down" by the Chieftains can be purchased on iTunes. You can find the recording of "For Christ the King (An Army of Youth)" on YouTube.

You can learn more about Ian Callanan's music by visiting his composer page at GIA publications.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"Night of Silence"

IMG_2890.JPG

Dan Kantor's song, "Night of Silence," has been sung and celebrated in churches and concert halls around the world. In this episode, Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert chat with Dan about writing vivid text, creating harmonic structure, and the importance of celebrating Advent. We also learn new words like "Quod Libet," and Matt gets Zack to both play his guitar and sing for our listeners. Special guest appearances made by Rob Strusinski and Rachel Held Evans.

So, please open your hymnal to "Night of Silence."

 

Episode links

For more information about Dan Kantor and his other compositions, visit his composer page at GIA Publications. You can find more information about his music and other projects at his personal website: www.danielkantor.com.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from GIA Publications. You can purchase the instrumental guitar recording of "Silent Night" (by Steve Petrunak) and the other version of "Night of Silence" (from David Haas' album "Star Child") at GIA Publications. The concert version of "Night of Silence" was performed by Yvonne Kenny and the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra and can be purchased from iTunes. You can also purchase the instrumental harp recording of "Silent Night" from iTunes.

Dan has produced an entire website dedicated to the song "Night of Silence" and the season of advent. You can find it at www.nightofsilence.com

The blog post by Rachel Held Evans can be found on her website: www.rachelheldevans.com/blog/unsentimental-advent

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"You Are All We Have"

19959410_1383429118400806_3089788045833279775_n.jpg

Fr. Francis Patrick (Fran) O'Brien is the guest for our Thanksgiving episode, and everyone is invited! Fran shares with Matt Reichert and Zack Stachowski his approach to text and melody, his musical influences, and what it's like to be both a liturgical composer and a parish pastor. Plus, there are lots of cameo appearances from Lucien Deiss, Alexander Peloquin, Stephen Sondheim, the cast of Hamilton, and (if you wait for it) Doc Severinsen. We'll need to get a bigger table!

So, please open your hymnal to "You Are All We Have."

 

Episode links

For more information about Fr. Fran O'Brien and his other compositions, visit his composer page at GIA Publications.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from GIA Publications. Here you can also purchase the other Fr. Fran O'Brien song you heard in the episode: "How Deep the Riches," and "Nativity Carol." While at GIA, you can purchase "Gloria of the Bells" by Alexander Peloquin and "No Greater Love" by Fr. Michael Joncas. The song "Grant To Us" by Lucien Deiss can be purchased at World Library Publications. Finally, "City of God" by Dan Schutte can be purchased at OCP. 

The song "Alexander Hamilton" from the musical Hamilton (Lin-Manuel Miranda), "Move On" from the musical Sunday in the Park with George (Stephen Sondheim), and "Johnny's Theme" (Doc Severinsen) can be purchased on iTunes. 

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"Somos el Cuerpo de Cristo"

19905018_1385033074907077_9115273223933130797_n.jpg

Jaime Cortez has dedicated a significant portion of his ministry to promoting Hispanic liturgies and bringing cultures together. In this conversation with Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert, Jaime shares the story of the beginnings of his working relationship with Bob Hurd, provides insight into composing bilingual music, and shares some of the intricacies of incorporating musical idioms into his liturgical compositions. This is another "must listen" conversation for anyone involved in a multi-cultural faith community.

So, please open your hymnal to "Somos el Cuerpo de Cristo."

 

Episode links

For more information about Jaime Cortez and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP.  

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Jaime Cortez songs you heard in the episode: "Rain Down," "Psalm 126: The Lord Has Done Great Things," and "Ven, Espiritu Santo." The recording of "Pueblo de Dios" and "Alleluia, Give the Glory" by Bob Hurd and "Bread of Life" by Rory Cooney can be purchased from OCP.

You can find out more about the One Call Institute by visiting their website.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

 

"Open My Eyes"

19989383_1383387861738265_4714103124951753732_n.jpg

Jesse Manibusan wears many titles: "Ambassador of Joy," "Catholic Ninja," "Itinerant Witness," and more. In this episode, Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert chat with Jesse about his journey to liturgical music, his work with - and advocacy for - young people in the Church, his experience with depression, and how he finds ways to radiate joy. If you work in ministry or work with young people, this is a conversation you will not want to miss.

So, please open your hymnal to "Open My Eyes."

 

Episode links

For more information about Jesse Manibusan and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP. You can also visit his website: www.jessemanibusan.com

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Jesse Manibusan song you heard in the episode, "Malo! Malo! Thanks Be to God." The recording of "Take All the Lost Home" by Joe Wise can be purchased from GIA Publications.

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "Open My Eyes" (arranged and performed by Jon Sarta) from iTunes. 

You can read the article about the Westminster study that Zack referenced at the University of Westminster's homepage.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"What You Have Done for Me"

19905359_1381794785230906_6820350024625768871_n.jpg

Tony Alonso is one of the most prominent voices in contemporary liturgical music. In this conversation, Matt Reichert and Zack Stachowski discuss with him the beginnings of his career, how he has developed his own compositional voice, the lessons he's learned, and the critical role of mentorship. 

So, please open your hymnal to "What You Have Done for Me."

 

Episode links

For more information about Tony Alonso and his other compositions, visit his composer pages at GIA Publications and World Library Publications. You can also visit his website: www.tonyalonso.com

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from GIA Publications. Here you can also purchase the other Tony Alonso songs you heard in this episode: "Come to the Table," "In the Arms of God," "Litany of Mary," and "A House of Prayer."

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "What You have Done for Me" (arranged and performed by Paul Tate) from GIA Publications. 

You can find out more about the work of Music Ministry Alive! by visiting the program website.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"Here I Am, Lord"

19989684_1385410994869285_449811484493166764_n.jpg

What's the biggest challenge when interviewing Dan Schutte? Deciding which song to discuss. Join Matt Reichert and Zack Stachowski as they speak with Dan about one of his most ubiquitous compositions, "Here I Am, Lord." In addition, they chat about one of the most prolific and consequential group of liturgical music composers: the St. Louis Jesuits. You'll learn about the group's beginnings, the impact of their Ignatian formation, their impact on the broader culture of the English-speaking Church, and more. Plus, you'll hear about a special college residence hall where the residents are the biggest fans of Dan's music that you'll ever meet!

NOTE: We had some sound difficulty with this episode, as one of our conversation tracks was corrupted. We still think it sounds pretty good, but we're sorry for the inconvenience!

So, please open your hymnal to "Here I Am, Lord."

 

Episode links

For more information about Dan Schutte and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP. You can also visit his website at www.danschutte.com

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Dan Schutte songs you heard in this episode: "Only This I Want," "Blest Be the Lord," and "Sing a New Song."

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording of "Here I Am, Lord" (arranged and performed by Paul Tate) from GIA Publications. 

You can learn more about the work of the St. Louis Jesuits by visiting their composer page at OCP. We used two songs from other members of the group in this episode, and you can purchase them on the OCP site: "One Bread, One Body" (John Foley), "Be Not Afraid" (Bob Dufford). 

You can purchase a recording of the University of Notre Dame fight song on iTunes.

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.

"Hail Mary: Gentle Woman"

There are numerous Marian hymns and songs in each Catholic hymnal. In this episode, Zack Stachowski and Matt Reichert discuss one of the best-loved and most-cherished, "Hail Mary: Gentle Woman". In conversation with the song's composer, Carey Landry, Zack and Matt discuss the imagery used to describe Mary, the surprising lack of congregational songs that incorporate the "Hail Mary" text, and the catechetical impact of Carey's music. Plus, Carey shares (and sings!) about his important ministry as a hospital chaplain. 

So, please open your hymnal to "Hail Mary: Gentle Woman."

 

Episode links

For more information about Carey Landry and his other compositions, visit his composer page at OCP.

You can purchase a copy of the score and a copy of the original song recording from OCP. Here you can also purchase the other Carey Landry songs you heard in this episode: "Only a Shadow," "Peace is Flowing Like a River," and "Bloom Where You're Planted."

You can purchase a copy of the instrumental piano recording (arranged and performed by Paul Tate) from GIA Publications. You can also purchase a copy of the choral recording (arranged by Richard Proulx and performed by the Cathedral Singers) and a copy of Dan Kantor's "Ave Maria" from GIA Publications. 

You can watch the video recording of Bobby McFerrin's live concert performance of the Bach/Gounod "Ave Maria", with the audience singing along, on YouTube. 

Don't forget to "subscribe" so you'll never miss an episode!

All content of this podcast is property of Open Your Hymnal or its content suppliers and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. For information about the podcast and its use, please contact us.